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Psychology Masters/PhD Dissertation Paper Writing Help

A Psychology student works on a variety of Psychology dissertation. Their daily tasks include a Psychology dissertation. Students require assistance with dissertation writing in their specific subject. Topicwize provides the highest quality dissertation writing assistance. Our dissertation assistance service is one-of-a-kind in every subject. Topicwize has been in business for a decade. As a result, we assist students in achieving high exam scores. A good grade can lead to a promising future for a student. Furthermore, we provide topic-specific solutions for each dissertation. In each subject, Topicwize has some experts. Every problem is solved correctly by an expert. They may also create graphs and tables for specific problems for students. Here are some example Psychology Masters/PhD Dissertation Writing Help Topics – 

  • The contribution of expectations, attention and emotional states to the perception of pain.
  • The extent to which objective methods of measurement can support theoretical approaches to consciousness.
  • Limitations of the modular view of the brain: The importance of feedback and cross-modulation in information processing.
  • Are indirect and direct theories of perception incompatible or can recent enactive accounts potentially lead to a compromise?
  • Assessing the development of implicit intergroup cognition in relation to in-groups and out-groups: social learning or pre-specified?
  • How studies of bilingualism and trilingualism in infants can indicate the degree of interaction between representational systems encoding for different languages in the brain.
  • The usefulness of the concept of ” grandmother cells ” for understanding the selectivity of neurons to high-level information processing, such as during facial recognition.
  • The relationship between impaired social cognition, emotion and anxiety disorders.
  • The role of implicit visual processing in the identification of objects: neural mechanisms and pathways.
  • Changes in neural processing in response to event segmentation: separating cause and effect in boundary recognition.
  • The sum of its parts? Consciousness is best explained as an output of implicit processes: implications for understanding intentionality.
  • Of all the areas of the cortex, the prefrontal area is paramount in demarcating what makes humans human.
  • The function of the prefrontal cortex can only be understood properly by considering how it relates to other areas of the brain.
  • Rather than being related to specific areas of the brain, language is best explained as a function of multiple overlapping neural circuits existing throughout the cortex.
  • Neural network theories might be able to account for some lower order functions of the brain but are unable to explain the representations that occur at higher areas: does the evidence reflect this?
  • As information flows from earlier sensory-specific areas to higher regions of the brain, representations become more integrated: consequences and implications.
  • Contribution of the cerebellum in relation to the higher functions of the cortex.
  • Limits to the plasticity of the adult human brain.
  • Are MRI studies a reliable indicator of brain function?
  • The claim that the right and left brain hemispheres have different processing styles is fundamental to understanding how the brain functions.
  • Parallel distributed processing is unable to provide an explanation for the higher functioning aspects of the human brain.
  • Baddeley’s model of working memory compared to contemporary alternative theories.
  • Working memory can best be explained as a function of long-term memory.
  • Evidence for the role of the hippocampus in memory formation and consolidation: application of evidence to neurodegenerative disorders like dementia.
  • The relationship between working memory and attention: bias in visual working memory and attention.
  • The role of the prefrontal cortex in short-term memory.
  • How emotional memory relates to episodic memory.
  • Attention depends on the progressive activation of forward areas of the brain.
  • Attention is better interpreted as a multivariate rather than a uni-modal concept.
  • View-dependent theories of vision are more successful in accounting for natural perception than view-independent theories.
  • Computer models of how perception occurs can lead to a misunderstanding of how the mechanisms of perception actually operate.
  • How visual illusions help understand perceptual processes.
  • Assessing the validity of Gibson’s theory of direct perception compared to constructivist accounts and more recent cognitive theories.
  • Why does the sense of time vary according to circumstances?
  • Is memory for past events partially influenced by the situation or context in which recall takes place?
  • Effective cognition is about selecting appropriate information at the right time in the correct order.
  • Does subliminal perception exist or is it part of a more complex phenomenon?
  • Hierarchical explanations of information flow and parallel distributed processing.
  • Can fMRI measures be used to accurately identify and distinguish deceptive information from guilty knowledge?
  • The reliability, validity, and usefulness of research findings from cognitive psychology applied to real-life behaviour and cognition.
  • The Network Neuroscience Theory: is general intelligence in humans a consequence of individual differences in neural network structure and architecture?
  • Are abilities unconnected with numeracy of children with dyscalculia affected by the condition or are they relatively independent?
  • The role of face stimuli in assessing the development of the human ventral pathway from infancy to adulthood.
  • The extent and role of plasticity in shaping visual cognitive development.
  • Explaining change during cognitive development: one type of learning mechanism or diverse learning paradigms for different problems?
  • Assessing whether intrinsic factors or the quality of interaction between human caregivers and children lead to successful learning outcomes.
  • The extent to which understanding the mechanisms of neural development can be informative as to how early cognition occurs.
  • Explaining how evidence for increasing integration of systems during the course of development can be assimilated with the increasing dissociation of structures.
  • The development of conversational understanding as a domain-general improvement in processing speed and working-memory capacity in cognitive effort.
  • The influence of culture on conversational understanding, where children do not normally communicate with adults.
  • Scale errors and action planning in children: Assessing the implications of DeLoache’s findings for understanding the “what/where” pathways in the human brain.
  • Developmental cognitive neuroscience’s significance for the early detection and treatment of developmental disorders.
  • Is Piaget’s theory of cognitive development still a valid theory in the light of modern findings in cognitive neuroscience?
  • How young children learn and thrive when their childhood is shaped by positive, secure relationships with knowledgeable adults, who are able to support their child’s learning and development.
  • How the notion of plasticity in child development can account for the child’s ability to change in response to negative or positive life experiences.
  • The acquisition of culture and biological growth is essential for child development.
  • Factors modulating automatic priming effects in relation to social behaviour: assessing magnitude and duration.
  • The influence of automatic effects of priming on complex behaviour in real-life situations.
  • An overlapping neural network representing the concept of self and other: Implications for sustaining self-integrity and understanding interpersonal relations.
  • Behavioural game theory: How players learn from and influence others in relation to strategic thinking, and the implications for real-life social interaction.
  • Assessing the contribution of reason and emotion in moral judgment through the social intuitionist model.
  • Early stable development of implicit social cognition and preference for in-groups: assessing how evaluation is assigned.
  • Charting how cognitive neuroscience can inform social psychology in terms of integrating social dimensions of cognition and knowledge of neural networks and mechanisms.
  • Agent-based computational models of collective behaviour: understanding group behaviour from the bottom-up.
  • The early onset of non-verbal communication in infants: nature or nature?
  • The Behaviour Stimulus Interaction (BSI) theory and cognitive conflict in approach/avoidance situations: The duration of the devaluation effect.
  • The enduring legacy of cognitive dissonance.
  • Is evolutionary psychology merely a field of enquiry or a robust paradigm for investigating human behaviour?
  • Investigating whether reciprocal altruism is adequate in explaining altruism in different social situations.
  • Why individual traits and cognitive modules fail to explain the complexities of human social behaviour.
  • Assessing the relative importance of facial symmetry, averageness and secondary sex characteristics as reliable indicators of mate choice.
  • Investigating whether artificially-induced examples of evolutionary game theory can be a valid means of assessing human behaviour in the real world.
  • Comparing sex differences in emotional outlook as a function of parental investment theory between principal biological carers and principal non-biological carers.
  • Discriminating between phobias and anxiety states that are adaptive compared to those that are learned.
  • Humans engage in social exchange behaviour using the same cognitive reasoning that enables them to engage in everything else they do.
  • Are human mental abilities better described by a general learning mechanism based on language or a more dedicated mechanism?
  • Human cognitive development as a proxy for understanding the evolution of the human brain.
  • The executive functions of the frontal cortex are what make humans unique.
  • An appraisal of Fodor’s modular account of the brain in the light of recent neuroscientific research.
  • A cheater detection module: fact or fantasy?
  • Ethnographic examples as a valid measure of universal human abilities.
  • Sex differences in attitudes to self as a function of evolutionary constraints.
  • How can evolutionary psychology explain anomalies in human decision-making?
  • Evolutionary psychology on group behaviour can explain the way in which humans behave in organisations whether that behaviour is rational or irrational.
  • Is Darwin’s theory of sexual selection still applicable for explaining cross-cultural activities and the human expression of emotions?
  • Questioning the validity of DSM-V as a tool for categorising abnormal psychological symptoms.
  • Relating subtypes with substance dependence to dissociable networks of disruption in the limbic system.
  • The significance of the anterior cingulated cortex for understanding cognitive deficits in schizophrenia.
  • The role of a dysfunctional amygdale and ventromedial prefrontal cortex in psychopathology.
  • A study of Schizophrenia as a multi-dimensional syndrome.
  • The extent to which the use of cannabis leads to deficits in working memory.
  • The role of MRI studies for assessing neurobiological theories that schizophrenia is caused by abnormal fronto-temporal lobe connections.
  • Can a malfunctioning mirror neuron system sufficiently account for autism or are additional explanations based on cognitive models of social behaviour required to understand the syndrome more fully?
  • The probable causes of face processing deficits in Autism Spectrum Disorder: social or visual?
  • Is category deficits evidence of category-specific knowledge or a more distributed system of processing?
  • Why do schizophrenics tend to experience auditory rather than visual hallucinations?
  • Can phobias be treated more effectively by medication, cognitive retraining therapies, behavioural techniques or psychotherapeutic approaches?
  • Can the fact that some autistics display isolated talents help explain the syndrome’s cause?
  • Assessing the symptoms of ADHD in adults and in children: Is there a different ADHD disorder for adults?
  • How do cognitive processes in individuals with schizophrenia differ to those of an individual with typical cognitive processes?
  • How, and in what ways is Intellectual development disorders (IDD) different from Autism Spectrum Disorders?
  • Evaluating whether the Health Personality Inventory can predict risk of substance misuse in adolescents.
  • In relation to cognitive dissonance, to what extent do extroverts and introverts differ when involved in group discussion.
  • To what extent can different forms of perfectionism predict attitudes to success and failure?
  • Can the use of personality inventories accurately assess different personality traits?
  • Can the identification of personality traits at a young age predict personality profiles in adults?
  • Creativity as a multi-faceted propensity: identifying the crucial traits and cognitive factors.
  • Drugs of choice and personality: differences between sensation seekers and the internally conflicted.
  • Personality and decision making: the role of impulsivity and rational thinking.
  • First impressions and the impact they have on assessing personality traits.
  • Predicting individuals at risk of suicide through identification of personality traits associated with extroversion and introversion.
  • Which personality inventories are the most effective in assessing personality?
  • To what extent can personality change over a period of time?
  • The effectiveness of using personality inventories for identifying personality disorders
  • The effectiveness of the current approach used to diagnosis personality disorders
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